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Okavango Delta

19 reviews

Safari suitability: 10/10

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All five of the Big Five can be seen here, including the very rare white rhinos, which have been reintroduced to the Moremi Game Reserve. A large number and variety of accommodations from luxury lodges to tented camps are available.

Found in: Botswana
Companies: 459
Tour packages: 222
Wildlife: 19 animals listed
Total area: 15,540 km² (6,000 mile²)
Anti-malarial: Not required

What YAS members think

Quality of wildlife:
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Most-visited month:
August
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Highlights

  • Kwara Concession

  • Moremi Game Reserve

  • One of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife

  • Perfect for viewing Africa’s big five

  • Large herds of buffalo and elephant

  • One of the largest packs of the endangered African wild dog

  • Best time to visit is between June and October.

About Okavango Delta

The Okavango: The river which never finds the sea

The Okavango Delta, unlike so much of the surrounding Kalahari Desert which covers most of Botswana, is a vast interconnected web of 15,540 km² (6,000 mile²) of marshland, lagoons, channels and islands formed by seasonal flooding. The Angola highlands to the northwest of Botswana receive three times the rainfall that Botswana does. Starting around November, this life-sustaining nourishment drains down the Okavango River, filling the fan-shaped delta throughout the months that follow. This welcome flood peaks between March and April, during which time the delta swells to three times its usual size.

The Okavango Delta is part of the vast Makgadikgadi Basin, the remnants of the great Makgadikgadi Lake that dried up 10,000 years ago. Although other parts of the basin consist of dry, barren salt pans, the Okavango Delta is a large inland river mouth that is incomparable for its lush, green beauty and unrivaled as an inviting home to one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife.

The Okavango Delta is called "the river which never finds the sea.” The majority of its waters are sucked up by plants or evaporated into the air, and only 2% of the floodwaters ever make it to the river’s destination, emptying into nearby Lake Ngami.

The resulting marshes are the playground of a huge variety of species including hippopotamus, blue wildebeest, giraffe, Nile crocodile, black rhinoceros, white rhinoceros, plains zebra, warthog and Chacma baboon. Large herds of elephant refresh themselves in water sometimes deep enough for them to swim through. Buffalo crowd together in the safety of the swamp. The lions which pad silently through soft sand make a ruckus in the shallow water and the noise sends the wary buffalo crashing through the marsh churning its water to white foam as they escape their predator.

Okavango Delta, Moremi Game Reserve

One of the best places to view wildlife is Moremi Game Reserve at the eastern end of the delta. It was named after Chief Moremi of the BaTawana tribe. The delta’s largest island, Chief’s Island, is an area of slightly higher ground lifted up by a fault line. Originally dedicated as the chief’s personal hunting grounds, it is now a wildlife sanctuary considered to be the most beautiful location for viewing the abundance of African flora and fauna. This is a significant protected area for African wild dog, making it a great place for viewing this endangered species. White rhinos have been re-introduced to Moremi Game Reserve, the only place to see them in the delta.

Private concessions in Okavango Delta

The Botswana government has also given some of the land in the Okavango Delta to outfitters who can then manage the land and offer private safaris.

Pros of doing a safari in a private reserve.

  1. One benefit of visiting a private concession is that the number of visitors is limited to only those staying at the concession’s camp. Most concessions limit the number of vehicles at an animal sighting to three, which makes for more intimate game viewing.
  2. The wildlife, particularly the predators, tend to be in better condition than in public reserves, possibly due to a more hands-on management.
  3. Because the number of visitors, and guides, is limited, the caliber of safari guides tends to be very high in privately managed reserves.

Cons of doing a safari in a private reserve

  1. The biggest downside of private concessions is they tend to be more expensive, as they are all-inclusive and often accessible only by charter plane.

Private concessions in the Okavango Delta include:

Kwara Concession

Kwara borders Moremi Game Reserve to the north. Its location allows for Mokoro (hand-dug canoe) rides on one of the many Okavango Channels, or for motorboat rides on the delta. Kwando Safaris operates three luxury camps here. Splash Camp was opened in 2018 and offers well-spaced out ‘tents’ of a very high caliber. Kwara and Little Kwara are also owned by Kwando, with Kwara being closed for renovations through the middle of 2019. This area offer spectacular bird-viewing opportunities and, in addition to the big cats, is known for its wild dogs.

The Okavango Delta is home to a large variety of antelope including lechwe, tsessebe, sitatunga, roan antelope, reedbuck, greater kudu, sable antelope, springbok and impala. The lechwe antelope is the most common large mammal, with more than 60,000 inhabiting the delta.  These swamp-dwelling antelopes, slightly larger than an impala, bound effortlessly through the swamp due to the natural water-repellent quality of the fur on their legs. They frolic freely in the water, seeming lighter than air as their dancing leaps provide not just forward movement but raise them to heights from which they can spy danger. The rarest aquatic antelope found in the Okavango is the demure sitatunga, which hides from predators by sinking into the water with just its nostrils showing. It can even sleep under water like this!

A completely unique experience of the Okavango Delta is a mokoro safari. Mokoro are traditional dugout canoes, and although the modern incarnations are made of fiberglass, the experience of gliding soundlessly through the swamp is as old as the waters themselves. Canoe trips through this Venice of Africa bring you face to face with wildlife. As the rhythmic poling sends the boat skimming across the tranquil surface, your awareness shifts, slows and settles as silence and stillness give way to the bustling activity of life in the marsh. Over 400 species of birds, including African fish eagle, Pel's fishing owl, ducks, geese, heron, crested crane, lilac-breasted roller, hammerkopf, ostrich and sacred ibis, fly above or wade through the delta. Fish flit through the waters of the lagoons, darting in between reeds and papyrus.

Surrounding the swamps is a forest that provides shade for herds of larger game and extending beyond the forests is open savanna where the greatest numbers of game exist, stalked by lion, leopard, cheetah, brown hyena, spotted hyena, and wild dog. Leopards can be seen lazing in trees during the day. The endangered African wild dog still survives in the Okavango Delta, which is home to one of the largest packs in Africa.

When to visit The Okavango Delta

Dry season: The best time to visit is in the dry season where game viewing is at its peak from June to October.

Rainy season: December to March. Because the delta is created from flood water not rain, the rainy season is the time that the delta is smallest. Animals tend to move away from the delta as other areas of the desert become green and lush. But with such an embarrassment of riches, fewer animals than usual still means many animals, migrating species arrive, and the birds love the rainy season.

"Walking safari in Okavango : an adrenalin booster"
Safari enthusiast
France France
221 kudus
Reviews (4)
Visited: Apr. 2018 Reviewed: Jun. 18, 2018

We spent two nights at the end of April 2018 in Okavango at the Oddballs enclave on a small island in the heart of Okavango just next to the airstrip. Respectful of the environment, the camp has five tents discreetly nestled into the environment but with the luxury of a comfortable bed, private and original shower and toilet, great food, etc. The floods hadn't yet arrived so we couldn't go on a full safari by mokoro (wooden canoe), but we did experience a short ride across an outlet during an early morning walking safari that lasted around three hours and that was an experience in itself. While the water was shallow and lotus flowers flourished, I felt a bit anxious about the fact that we may not be alone in the water ... The highlight of this three-hour walking safari was a male lion resting in the shade at around 40 metres from where we were standing. It's a place to communicate with mother nature and contemplate on its beauty. Safaris at this camp are by foot or by mokoro so the only noises are those of the animals, hippos in particular. The grasses at the end of April were high and lush. The red and orange colours at sunrise and sunset simply breathtaking. The highlight of our last morning on the island were a family of hippos at sunrise on the banks and in the water of the Moremi River.

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Safari enthusiast
France France
Visited: Apr. 2018
Reviewed: Jun. 18, 2018

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"Okavango Delta"
Safari guru
Australia Australia
69 kudus
Reviews (4)
Visited: Aug. 2019 Reviewed: Feb. 25, 2020

In 2018 my husband and I headed to the Okavango Delta for two days as a part of our 5-week trip through Africa. We drove to Maun Botswana from Johannesburg South Africa so that we could enter into the Okavango Delta. We went through a village to meet our guides and board our Mokoros, which is a dug-out canoe which is used by the locals. There was two of us sitting in each canoe with our guide standing up the end with a long pole which was used to push/pull us through the water which was only roughly about 3-4 foot deep. As we made our way down to our camp site, we came across hippos only 10 metres away from us. They were very vocal and I will admit that being so close in a small canoe was very intimidating but wow what an experience. The canoe ride was about 40 mins. Such beautiful scenery. We camped on the water away from where the hippos were however, we were told that at night time the hippos, lions, hyenas and other species of animals would probably walk through our camp. Once we arrived at our campsite, we set up our canvas tents and hung out at camp chatting with our guides and helping prepare for dinner. The next day we headed out on an all-day walking safari. We saw lots of antelope, hippos, an aardvark, a honey badger and also followed leopard tracks but unfortunately did not see any leopards. I really recommend this place as it is truly wild and amazing. The last night we had there we were treated to traditional dancing and singing from all our guides and played camp fire games. It was a great night and a great few days in Wild Africa.

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By: Sambell
Safari guru
Australia Australia
Visited: Aug. 2019
Reviewed: Feb. 25, 2020

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"Pan handle of the Okavango Delta"
Safari guru
Namibia Namibia
94 kudus
Reviews (10)
Visited: Jul. 2019 Reviewed: Sep. 12, 2019

This area in northern Botswana knows as the Pan Handle of the Okavango delta is breathtaking and has a huge concentration of wildlife and of course birdlife. The Shakawe area is a birdwatchers’ paradise with huge amounts of birds being present, special birds in the area include Pel's Fishing Owl, Brown Firefinch, Swamp Boubou, Slaty Egret, Lesser Jacana, Wattled Crane, White-backed Night Heron, Chirping and Luapula Cisticola, Greater Swamp-Warbler, African Mourning Dove, Coppery-tailed Coucal, African Skimmer, Allen's Gallinule, Lesser Moorhen and Western Banded Snake-Eagle. Rarities include African Hobby, Osprey, Half-collared Kingfisher, Dickinson's Kestrel and Bat Hawk to name a few. Mammal sighting too are incredible with elephant coming down to drink, Red Lechwe, sitatunga, hippos and otters all being abundant. There is a wide variety of accommodation available in the area and a boat cruise along the Okavango is a must to really take the delta in. Some of the lodges also offer mokoro (traditional wooden canoes) trips and this is an excellent way of experiencing and exploring the Okavango Delta. A trip from Namibia (the Caprivi) is easily doable for a few nights and well worth it as one will travel through the Mahangu reserve towards the Botswana side and encounter many different mammals and birds. I would suggest a trip to this area for any of the birders visiting the area.

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Namibia Namibia
Visited: Jul. 2019
Reviewed: Sep. 12, 2019

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"Kwando Splash Camp - Okavango Delta"
Safari enthusiast
United States United States
259 kudus
Reviews (13)
Visited: Jan. 2019 Reviewed: Mar. 28, 2019

I spent two nights at Kwando’s Splash camp located in the open grassy plains in the region of the delta and would highly recommend it. This camp opened in June 2018 and is relatively new at the time of writing this review. With this being a private reserve/concession means off-road game viewing is permitted which made it easier to get better sightings. Importantly, this does not make it too stressful for animals with crowd control measures the reserve has in place. I had an excellent driver/guide and spotter. Our driver/guide had a good grasp of English, communicated well, was very knowledgeable on the flora and fauna and keenly shared his knowledge. Some of my sightings: Seeing a serval cat at dusk as we headed back to camp from game drive. I wanted to see a kill and finally got to see one – a yellow-billed stork managed to capture a frog right before my eyes. It then struggled to swallow it for the next five minutes as the frog jiggled and eventually gave up on life. I saw lots of zebra, a resident adult male cheetah, wild dog tracks but no luck finding them, bat-eared foxes, two honey badgers, lots of hippos, dung beetles and a spotted hyena among other general game. I did a motorized boat ride with a large group of guests. This is offered as one of the alternative activities to the game drive and makes for a nice change if you've been on many game drives. With such tall grass on the banks there wasn't much viewing besides birds and hippos. The waterway is narrow and at one point the passageway was blocked by a pod of hippos we had to pass. This was intimidating. For accommodation I had a spacious luxury tent kitted out with all the amenities I could have needed and both indoor and outdoor showers. All tents were nicely spaced so you cannot see or hear other guests. The Kwando vehicles were in great condition, spacious and limited to six guests per vehicle, that is two in each row so nobody is stuck between two people. I highly recommend hiring your own vehicle rather than sharing with some unknown party, that way you control how you want to spend your time. I found Kwando camp staff to be very courteous at all times. The hospitality and food was faultless.

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By: steve_c
Safari enthusiast
United States United States
Visited: Jan. 2019
Reviewed: Mar. 28, 2019

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"View from the plane so memorable"
Safari guru
South Africa South Africa
39 kudus
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Reviews (5)
Visited: Jun. 2011 Reviewed: Mar. 25, 2019

I went to the famous Delta with 2 work colleagues for a trip and we had the time of our lives such a memorable safari. Upon arrival at Maun Airport you board a light aircraft plane and fly quite low over the Delta and all the channels and you can see elephants even from the plane. You touch down at an airstrip close to your lodge and the safari starts already with your transfer by 4x4 to your camp or lodge. We stayed in a luxury tented camp and there is nothing better than sitting around the fire at night and listening to the bush sounds and getting to know the other visitors in the camp. A highlight was a boat cruise along the channel in front of the lodge and we got to see many hippos or elephants along the side of the channel. We also followed a lion for a long time while she was walking through the bush. 5/5 rating I feel as the Okavango Delta is very special with land and water-based game viewing.

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Safari guru
South Africa South Africa
Visited: Jun. 2011
Reviewed: Mar. 25, 2019

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"Splash Camp and Okavango Delta"
Safari enthusiast
United States United States
146 kudus
Reviews (6)
Visited: Jan. 2019 Reviewed: Feb. 19, 2019

We stayed at the Lagoon Resort area for three of them and then flew to the Splash Resort area for the last two. This is my fourth safari in Africa and the first not in a national park, those being Serengeti, Central Kalahari, and Nxai Pan. We landed on a small airstrip about an hour drive from our very remote, modern, with all the amenities I could want or need in a resort. That afternoon and every morning/afternoon we went with a driver/guide and tracker to not just view what we ran across but actually track and find the animals. Different from the National Park trips where you spend much more time long distant viewing and usually more crowded. All the staff from Kwando Safaris I dealt with were very polite, attentive and willing to please. Animal highlights were a gorgeous male cheetah, hyena, marabou storks and a civet.

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Safari enthusiast
United States United States
Visited: Jan. 2019
Reviewed: Feb. 19, 2019

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"Elephants and leopards"
Safari guru
South Africa South Africa
287 kudus
Reviews (5)
Visited: May. 2016 Reviewed: Feb. 01, 2017

I have been to the Okavango Delta a number of times and I must be honest, each time I return, I am blown away. The closeness of nature, the sounds of the bush, the little surprises (elephant in camp), encountering a leopard on the way to the airstrip (when you think that the game viewing is over and nothing more exciting could happen) and the surprise bush dinner under the stars. In May 2016 I visited a few places in Botswana (not my first visit) and still I was excited as if it was my first visit. We flew into the airstrip, excited as children. The birding in the Okavango Delta is brilliant, from malachite kingfishers to African Fish Eagles. The bird chatter in the morning is an exciting a teaser of what is to come. The Okavango Delta is seasonal and activities depend on the water levels. I loved the remoteness of the area, and the low numbers of other safari goers. This is key because that is what Botswana is all about, low volume and high quality. When choosing a camp you should take special note if they are land only, water only or a combination of land and water. The variety of activities is important (mokoro, walking, boating and game drives). Whilst the activities provide the opportunity to enjoy Botswana wildlife and bird life, remember to take time to simply sit and relax in this beautiful area. Other highlights of my visit included dipping my feet in the cool, crystal clear waters of the Okavango Delta, dining under the stars in the bush, gliding through the water in a mokoro and watching the sky change colour as the sun set behind the horizon.

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Safari guru
South Africa South Africa
Visited: May. 2016
Reviewed: Feb. 01, 2017

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"Okavango Delta"
Safari enthusiast
Sweden Sweden
24 kudus
Photos (0)
Reviews (2)
Visited: Aug. 2014 Reviewed: Jul. 16, 2015

The Okavango Delta has to be one of the most beautiful places myself and my husband have ever visited. We stayed in 3 lodges which gave a good level of service and a mixed idea of activities from floating gently on the water to nights drives in game drive vehicles. The area is of outstanding beauty but the highlight was being able to watch the wonderful wild dogs for several day. We wiped recommend a trip to Botswana's Okavango Delta to anyone and we hope to be going back soon.

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By: Linda
Safari enthusiast
Sweden Sweden
Visited: Aug. 2014
Reviewed: Jul. 16, 2015

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"Big Boys of Botswana"
Safari guru
Australia Australia
103 kudus
Reviews (2)
Visited: Dec. 2014 Reviewed: Feb. 13, 2015

I had the luxury of five nights in Botswana in December and discovered who the big boys of this country really are! I also smashed a lot of my own safari misconceptions... First stop, Kalahari Plains Camp and the endless desert that I thought may not be that exciting for a safari old hat like me. Misconception number one... of many to come. It's true that you won't see masses of wildlife at all times of the year. We were there before rains had come meaning wildlife was really spread out. When the rains come, the plains in front of this camp TEEM with wildlife... so for us it was more of a challenge but boy were we rewarded. From the denning cape foxes in front of camp to the thousands of red-billed quelea swarming and shifting across the plains to the elusive yet very vocal Kalahari lions... this place rocked and I have a new found appreciation for desert landscape and the smaller species. Oryx are truly the big boys in town here, their large herds and dominant males strutting around were enough to impress the most experienced safari-goer. My favourite experience here was a wheel blow out and being 'stuck' in 35 degree desert heat just watching the plains horizon and the wildlife appear through the heat haze and disappear again. Then a surprise bush lunch - well deserved after that I can tell you... and we literally dined under beautiful trees alongside a few wildebeest and oryx escaping the heat. They were literally a few metres from my buffet lunch table! So my top tip for Kalahari - go in green season, so January through to around March I think for big hitting wildlife, afternoon storms and those endless plains alive with animals. Big Boys of Botswana's Okavango Delta greeted us next the moment we tried to land. It's not the elephants or lions - that was my misconception too for many years. It is the buffalo. These animals mean business, they don't muck about as solo grazers unless they are old males and instead stay in herds, usually quite impressive numbers and move like a football pack through the bush. As luck would have it, they were crossing the landing strip as we were approaching. A few fly bys and we eventually moved the big boys on and landed. The herd stared us down as if angry at the intrusion. It wasn't the first time they would demonstrate their discontent with us. The next few days were action packed at Duba Plains as we watched for the well documented lion versus buffalo confrontation. From here, we flew up to the Selinda region and had our last few nights in two luxury camps, Selinda Camp and the outstandingly memorable and 'take me back tomorrow' Zarafa. Up here, the big boys are led by the ladies... wild dog. Another of my misconceptions busted... for this region is famous for its huge elephant herds... they are literally 'big' but it is the wild dog that dominate the safari scene right now. This species believe in Alpha females (hooray) and I feel so blessed to have had the opportunity to watch them rest, play, hunt, catch and kill multiple times over. The kill is not a pretty event to witness, but it's over in an instant as they literally rip the animal to pieces leaving nothing behind. But the hunt is the most adrenaline rush wildlife experience I have ever had. Their pack precision and ambush tactics are outstanding to watch all whilst in a 4x4 that is open-sided and belting through the bush at break neck speed. Our last night at Zarafa was unforgettable, and not just for the luxury and beautiful setting. Whilst sitting on our private deck with feet in plunge pool and gin and tonic in hand, we saw a young impala bolt past within metres of us. Unusual to be alone and running so fast. We wondered what it was running from. It wasn't long before we saw the familiar markings of wild dog sprint right up to us, pause for moments arms length away and then continue the hunt. Our hearts raced as fast as the wild dogs could hunt. They then double backed to look at us and one even came running down the path towards us. Did we become the prey? Has wild dog ever eaten a human before? Not that we know of... it was merely responding to the sounds of broken twigs under our feet as we were sprinting to get our camera. So what did I take from my Botswana experience? The big boys of any safari are not always your usual suspects. Go into every safari experience with open mind, no expectations and you shall be rewarded. For it's the opportunity to truly immerse yourself in a wilderness that surprises you. Its residents will fascinate, surprise and overwhelm you. Thanks to Wilderness Safaris for showing me a new side to Botswana and breaking many of my misconceptions.

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Safari guru
Australia Australia
Visited: Dec. 2014
Reviewed: Feb. 13, 2015

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"Heavenly Wilderness!"
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South Africa South Africa
12 kudus
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Reviews (1)
Visited: Aug. 2014 Reviewed: Nov. 20, 2014

The Okavango Delta offers on elf the most pristine wilderness areas in Africa to explore. This unique ecosystem with the annual flood pouring into one of the driest regions creates a water wonderland in from April-October. The onset of the summer rains attract a plethora of birdlife and the lambing of many herbivores. The predators here are in abundance and the protection of wildlife is paramount to the government. Ideally linked with the Linyanti/Chobe region and Victoria Falls.

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Safari enthusiast
South Africa South Africa
Visited: Aug. 2014
Reviewed: Nov. 20, 2014

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"Watery Wonderland"
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Morocco Morocco
255 kudus
Reviews (2)
Visited: Jun. 2010 Reviewed: Oct. 03, 2014

The Okavango Delta is one of my most vivid and memorable African experiences. The feeling of slowly meandering around the waterways of the delta in a mokoro as wild elephant and giraffe wander by, crocodiles peer out over the water's surface and hippos play while the sun sets will stay with me forever. I took a scenic flight over the delta to put this immense landscape into perspective - such a surreal place!

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Visited: Jun. 2010
Reviewed: Oct. 03, 2014

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Most people visiting the Okavango Delta will be visiting Moremi Game Reserve. The southern entrance to Moremi is roughly 100 km from Maun. The first part of the journey is on a paved road, but the last part of the journey requires a 4x4, as it's mainly a sandy, wide-track road. The northern gate, Khwai, is roughly 2.5 hours from Maun. Khwai is where the current headquarters of the reserve are situated. It's important to note that there are no petrol/gas stations within the park. 

In Khwai you will find a large public camping ground situated in a well-shaded area overlooking the river. At Khwai, a long bridge constructed entirely out of mopane poles, forms a picturesque entrance to the reserve for visitors arriving from the north. This bridge, which rattles and shakes as vehicles pass over it, must be one of the most photographed structures in the northern areas of Botswana and is so much a part of the character of Moremi. (Courtesy of Dept of Wildlife and National Parks). It's advisable to bring a jerrycan or two for reserves.

It is also possible to do a fly-in safari using a private charter. Many visitors use charter companies based in Maun to fly to the various lodges in Botswana. These include Delta AirMack AirMoremi Air Services, Wilderness AirWildlife Helicopters and Kalahari Air Services.

The following airlines travel to Okavango Delta


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Botswana's national carrier. Air Botswana, Botswana's national carrier is the flagship and pride of Botswana. Today, Air Botswana enjoys a wide and acclaimed reputation quite disproportionate to its modest size as a model, quality airline. Currently, Air Botswana operates and maintains a fleet of BAE 146 as well as ATR42-500 and ATR72-500 advanced turbo propeller aircrafts which operate daily domestic and regional scheduled flights. Visit website

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At Air Shakawe we offer a range of flights to suit every traveller’s need. Based at Maun International Airport, we operate daily flights over the Okavango Delta as well as to lodge transfers between the various lodges in Botswana. With regular flights between Limpopo Valley, Maun and Kasane we make it possible for travellers to connect to their next destination in the quickest possible way. We strive to provide every passenger with the best possible service, to have fun and experience Botswana from the air with breathtaking views of the Okavango Delta. Scenic flights over the Okavango Delta are one of the most popular activities there is to offer while passing through Maun. Whether you are the avid overland traveller with a limited budget or require an exclusive private flight, we can arrange it all. Safety is a top priority, our crew is trained by highly experienced pilots and undergo flight tests every 6 months. Contact Air Shakawe for your next personal or business trip, and be assured of an exclusive, convenient and safe journey. Visit website

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Flying Mission Services is based in Botswana and provides flight and maintenance services throughout Southern Africa. Charter Flights – FMS offers on-demand charter flights from Gaborone and Maun to points throughout Southern Africa. Many of these flights are flown from our secondary base in Maun to safari camps in the Okavango Delta. Air Ambulance Service – FMS holds the exclusive contract with the Botswana Ministry of Health to provide emergency air ambulance service to hospitals throughout the country. Maintenance & Other Aviation Services – FMS operates a fully licensed aircraft repair facility and has recently opened an aircraft maintenance training program. Visit website

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Botswana-based Helicopter Horizons is an experiential helicopter company, specializing in helicopter experiences for every traveler to the Okavango Delta, Makgadikgadi Pans, and the Kalahari Desert. From scenic and photography flights to private transfers, helicopter safaris, and various helicopter experiences such as village & Tsodilo Hills tours. Our team of over 10 pilots from around the world are highly experienced and extremely passionate about sharing their love of the region with each and every guest on board. Experiencing the incredible lagoons, crystal clear channels, and islands of the Okavango Delta is best from above, where you get to see the full expanse of this indescribable region. Explore Your World! Visit website

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Kavango Air was established in 2005 by Mark Smith who has been operating aircraft in northern Botswana since 1990. Kavango Air strives to keep safety its first priority, punctuality it’s second and also keeping the flight enjoyable at the same time. Based in Maun (Botswana) on the edge of the Okavango Delta, it is ideally positioned for quick scenic flights over the delta, as well as camp transfers to the numerous lodges and camps in the delta and surrounding areas. Kavango Air does air charters to almost anywhere in Southern Africa, and also does medical evacuations. The crew receives extensive training in bush flying techniques, and the pilots have to adhere to the high safety standards instilled by the company. Visit website

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MACK AIR is a fixed-wing charter company operating from Maun International Airport in northern Botswana. Based in Maun, the gateway to the Okavango, our destinations are throughout Botswana and neighbouring countries reaching as far as Johannesburg, Victoria Falls, Vilanculos and Windhoek. Visit website

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Majestic Air provides a highly efficient service to travelers who wish to avoid the tedium of travel on South Africa's congested roads and in railways. Majestic Air is owned by David Maree who, as a businessman and commercial pilot, has used aircraft for business travel within South Africa and neighbouring countries. He has personal experience of the practical and cost-effective benefits of the use of aircraft as an alternative to travel by car and train. Majestic Air is operated by Multimedia Entertainment Group Air (PTY) Ltd) trading as MEGA Air as Air Charter & schedule Company in South Africa. The Company was established in the year 2004. Their aircrafts are capable of operating to smaller or rural airports where scheduled services are not able to. Visit website

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Major Blue Air is always ready to take you where you need to go. Based in Maun, Botswana – right on the edge of the Okavango Delta - Major Blue Air invites you to experience the awe-inspiring views that can only be seen by air. Whether you are looking for a scenic flight over the vast reaches of the Delta or to charter one of our top of the range aircraft to get you to where you need to be, Major Blue Air will provide you with outstanding service and a flight that you will never forget. Constantly expanding our flight range, it is our pleasure to take you anywhere in southern Africa, and further if desired! Regardless of the distance or duration of the flight, we are dedicated to providing you with Excellence in Aviation. Major Blue Air Hangar is situated at Sir Seretse Khama International Airport in Gaborone. Visit website

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Moremi Air Services (Pty) Ltd, is an air charter company based from Maun in Botswana. The company has been operating since 1997 and has been under new management from June 2003. With have a fleet of 8 different aircraft suited to regional and international flying – both single and twin-engine, as well as turbine aircraft. We operate from Botswana and into Zambia, South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Visit website

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Wilderness Air is proud to be the air partner of Wilderness Safaris, a responsible ecotourism and conservation company with private access to the finest wilderness and wildlife areas of southern Africa. Wilderness Air began operating in 1991, with one aircraft based in Botswana servicing two camps in the Okavango Delta. Today, Wilderness Air is also based in Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe, operating over 35 aircraft and employing over 50 pilots. Throughout its time, it has maintained its excellent reputation for safety and guest service. We operate a varied fleet of light aircraft, chosen for their ability to transport visitors comfortably to remote wilderness destinations with dirt airstrips. Each aircraft type has been selected based on its ability to transport different numbers of passengers, over different ranges. Our fleet operates on a daily circuit within the regions. Wilderness Air is privileged to fly into some of the most pristine wilderness areas in the world. We believe that flying is an integral part of each guest's travel experience and that our pilots' passion and professionalism can make a genuine contribution to journeys that change lives. Visit website

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Okavango Delta map